Claire-de-lune
robinade:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

i want one. i don’t even have a mustache.

ngl, I kinda wondered about this. 

robinade:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

i want one. i don’t even have a mustache.

ngl, I kinda wondered about this. 

dantealicheery:

dimensionsinprobability:

You would think that maybe Tony would be genre-savvy with the whole renegade-destruction-robot-apocalypse thing, but no

Of course he would take it as a challenge. 

historicalagentcarter:

When World War II broke out in 1939, Josephine Baker was already an established star in France. After emigrating from the United States to France in the 1920s, Baker had made a name as a comedienne, singer and dancer; by 1927, she was the highest-paid entertainer in Europe. In 1934, she starred in the French film Zou-Zou, making her the first black woman to have a leading role in a film.
At the start of the war, she was recruited by the Deuxième Bureau, the intelligence branch of Charles de Gaulle’s Free French Forces. As an entertainer, Baker was able to attract less notice as she traveled throughout Europe and North Africa, gathering information for the French Resistance and passing information from France to contacts in other countries. Information and messages were written in invisible ink in the margins of the sheet music she traveled with.
While in North Africa, Baker performed for US troops stationed there, often ordering the desegregation of her audiences before her performance could begin. As a member of the Resistance, Baker was aware of troop movements, more so than the men for whom she performed. She later said, “Often I knew the men would be sent into battle before they knew. To see them in front of me so full of life and enthusiasm, and knowing that many of them wouldn’t come back alive, was the hardest part of the tour.”
Baker was the first American-born woman to receive the Croix de Geurre, and also received the Légion d’honneur and the Rosette of the Resistance. She was made a member of the Forces Français Libres. Baker, a lifelong activist, wore her FFL uniform when she spoke at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s March on Washington.
 Learn more about Josephine Baker at the National Women’s History Museum and at the Official Site of Josephine Baker. Watch Baker perform in Zou-Zou here.

historicalagentcarter:

When World War II broke out in 1939, Josephine Baker was already an established star in France. After emigrating from the United States to France in the 1920s, Baker had made a name as a comedienne, singer and dancer; by 1927, she was the highest-paid entertainer in Europe. In 1934, she starred in the French film Zou-Zou, making her the first black woman to have a leading role in a film.

At the start of the war, she was recruited by the Deuxième Bureau, the intelligence branch of Charles de Gaulle’s Free French Forces. As an entertainer, Baker was able to attract less notice as she traveled throughout Europe and North Africa, gathering information for the French Resistance and passing information from France to contacts in other countries. Information and messages were written in invisible ink in the margins of the sheet music she traveled with.

While in North Africa, Baker performed for US troops stationed there, often ordering the desegregation of her audiences before her performance could begin. As a member of the Resistance, Baker was aware of troop movements, more so than the men for whom she performed. She later said, “Often I knew the men would be sent into battle before they knew. To see them in front of me so full of life and enthusiasm, and knowing that many of them wouldn’t come back alive, was the hardest part of the tour.”

Baker was the first American-born woman to receive the Croix de Geurre, and also received the Légion d’honneur and the Rosette of the Resistance. She was made a member of the Forces Français Libres. Baker, a lifelong activist, wore her FFL uniform when she spoke at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s March on Washington.

 Learn more about Josephine Baker at the National Women’s History Museum and at the Official Site of Josephine Baker. Watch Baker perform in Zou-Zou here.

lexgurst:



Josephine Baker in the uniform of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Free French Air Force. By the autumn of 1944 she had raised 3,143,000F for the French war effort and was awarded the honorary rank of sub-lieutenant in the Ladies Auxiliary of the Free French Air Force, Les Filles De L’Air. She gained her pilot license in 1933! Photographed at the Savoy Hotel, London April 1945 .

lexgurst:

Josephine Baker in the uniform of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Free French Air Force. By the autumn of 1944 she had raised 3,143,000F for the French war effort and was awarded the honorary rank of sub-lieutenant in the Ladies Auxiliary of the Free French Air Force, Les Filles De L’Air. She gained her pilot license in 1933! Photographed at the Savoy Hotel, London April 1945 .

affectingly:

thepondsaregone:

thorinoakenbutt:

castielandpie:

poryqon:

it bothers me that Kansas and Arkansas are not pronounced the same

I’m from the UK and I have been pronouncing Arkansas as Ar-Kansas my whole life

For all my non-american friends, Arkansas is pronounced ark-an-saw

WHAT

It’s okay, I’ve lived 4 hours north of Arkansas my whole life, been there many times. Sometimes I still call it Ar-Kansas in my head. 

Also, this is how I felt when I found out that Kanata and Canada were not pronounced with the same emphasis on syllables. (Ka-NAH-ta, apparently.)

cosplayingwhileblack:

X
Character: Frozone
Series: The Incredibles

cosplayingwhileblack:

X

Character: Frozone

Series: The Incredibles

I’ve reached the point apparently where I can’t read the word weirdo without hearing it in nanami’s voice. 

also do I look especially hobbit-esque in those pics?

I think its the barefoot + brown dress + the fact that I can still fit my entire body in that shot because I am so damn short. 

Basically its further proof I should have been a hobbit. 

claireexperimentswithcosplay:

~ a dream is a wish your hearts makes ~

No access to a full length mirror requires a certain amount of selfie creativity. Ignore the messy bathroom. 

Minus tacking the apron to the dress so I don’t have have to constantly re-adjust, Cinderella is complete. The apron and dress were made by me and the bandana was bought this afternoon at A.C. Moore after I remembered that bandanas are a thing that exists. 

5 year old me is so stoked right now. 

First of the Dragon*Con cosplays is complete. Even if everything else crashes and burns, I’ll at least have Cindy!